(ILLUSTRATION BY HUGO DUBON)

Interview with Tim Ryan

2017 Alberta Views Short Story Contest Winner

By AV Staff

 

AV: What was the inspiration for your story?

The inspiration for this story was a cottage and dock that I used every summer when I was  kid.  I wanted to explore the thoughts that kids have when they face something for the first time — whatever it may be.

AV: Had you been published before? 

Tough question.  I had a couple of short stories published a long time ago.  I consider those stories to be published by a different person.  I then had a very long gap between writing anything creative. I did have another story published at about the same time as “Scottie”.

AV: How did you feel when you won the contest? 

I thought it was a joke when I got the call.  Then I got very, very excited.  My daughter took the brunt of my enthusiasm and did so with all of her 11 year-old grace: “That’s great Dad.  No when are you going to write the story about space elephants and alien giraffes like you promised?”

AV: What advice do you have for other aspiring short story writers?

Take your time.  Don’t rush to get finished.  I think the best parts of my stories happen in the fourth or fifth revision when I finally know who my character is.

AV: What’s happened since your story was published? What’s new for you in your career?

I am working on the rest of the collection of short stories of which “Scottie” is a part. There are eleven short pieces and a novella to end the cycle.  They are all set in the same location on the same day  with intersecting story lines.  I am getting very close to finished.  I hope to have a manuscript done by August.  Then I have to decide what I do with it

Tim Ryan won the 2017 Alberta Views Short Story contest for his story Scottie.

For more information and to submit your entry to the 2018 contest, click here.

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